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questions remaining here. thank you both. >> ifill: protests surrounding egyptian president mohammed morsi's recent power grab and a hastily drafted constitution turned violent again today. jeffrey brown reports. >> brown: police outside the presidential palace in cairo retreated this evening after a crowd broke through their lines. officers fired back with tear gas but eventually a loud... allowed protestors to make their way to the palace gates. some threw stones toward the billing. security officials said president mohammed morsi left the palace as the demonstrations grew larger, reportedly to more than 100,000. it has become commonplace in the last few weeks. they follow morsi's recent decree that expands his powers and hastily drafted constitution put together by an islamist dominated committee. >> we won't be able to speak. there won't be a court that we can go talk to. he has made himself a force and he said it is a rather force. this is something we cannot believe. we've been 0 years being betrayed. we won't believe morsi. he will remain seated in the chair and not leave it. >> bro
hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: last year, they ousted a dictator. last night, they turned against one another. religious and secular egyptians fighting outside the palace of their first freely-elected president. after riot police gave up keeping the two warring sides apart. seven people were killed and hundreds were injured. both sides were armed with clubs, but eyewitnesses said the first gunfire came from president morsi's supporters. the president's opponents let off fireworks. but they say they won't back down until the president gives up sweeping new powers or resigns. this morning, the army moved in. not to mount a military coup, but to defend a president they would once have jailed for his political views. the commander of these troops said these tanks were just to keep rival factions apart. but if mr. morsi can trigg
" or islamic law from supporters of president mohammed morsi in cairo. morsi, morsi, they chanted. reporters also gathered in the coastal city of alexandria this evening, just days before a referendum on a draft constitution. it would affirm many tenets of sharia as the law of the land. >> i support the president. i think that opponents of the president claim that egypt would turn into an islamic state. but the reality is if they do not want a constitution that contains islamic law and they fear the growth of the islamic political current. >> suarez: back in cairo, morsi's opponents gathered again, separated from the president's muslim brotherhood backers by barricades. >> all these barricades you see here will not stop a million revolutionaries. they will eat these stones, not demolish them. they will eat them. >> suarez: violence between the two sides last week killed seven and wounded hundreds. and before dawn today, masked gunman sprayed birth shot at protestors in tahrir square miles from the presidential palace. nine people were hurt. amid the action in the streets, some in the anti-mo
today the probe will focus on nobel peace laureate mohammed el-baradei, former foreign minister amr moussa and former presidential candidate hamdeen sabahi. all three oppose islamist president mohammed morsi and the country's new constitution. the new u.s. senator from hawaii democrat brian schatz was sworn in today. he'd been lieutenant governor for the last two years. now, he replaces fellow democrat daniel inouye, who died this month at the age of 88. schatz took the oath of office on the senate floor after being tapped by hawaii's governor. the new senator said he'll seek election in his own right, in 2014. inouye wanted hawaii congresswoman colleen hanabusa to take his seat. she said today she respects the governor's choice. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: we turn now to russia, where a proposed new law on adoptions, causing alarm in the united states, came a step closer to being enacted today. ray suarez has the story. >> reporter: in moscow today, president vladimir putin said he does intend to sign a bill that bars americans from
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

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